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Contents
About Psychoanalysis
For Children and Adolescents
Is it Only Therapy?
The Psychoanalytic Tradition
Who Can Benefit?
Who is a Psychoanalyst?
How to find a Psychoanalyst
The American Psychoanalytic Association

About Psychoanalysis


When people ask what psychoanalysis is, they usually want to know about treatment. As a therapy, psychoanalysis is based on the observation that individuals are often unaware of many of the factors that determine their emotions and behavior. These unconscious factors may create unhappiness, sometimes in the form of recognizable symptoms and at other times as troubling personality traits, difficulties in work or in love relationships, or disturbances in mood and self-esteem. Because these forces are unconscious, the advice of friends and family, the reading of selfhelp books, or even the most determined efforts of will, often fail to provide relief Psychoanalytic treatment demonstrates how these unconscious factors affect current relationships and patterns of behavior, traces them back to their historical origins, shows how they have changed and developed over time, and helps the individual to deal better with the realities of adult life. 

Analysis is an intimate partnership in the course of which the patient becomes aware of the underlying sources of his or her difficulties not simply intellectually, but emotionally—by re-experiencing them with the analyst. Typically, the patient comes four or five times a week, lies on a couch, and attempts to say everything that comes to mind. These conditions create the analytic setting, which permits the emergence of aspects of the mind not accessible to other methods of observation. As the patient speaks, hints of the unconscious sources of current difficulties gradually begin to appear—in certain repetitive patterns of behavior, in the subjects which the patient finds hard to talk about, in the ways the patient relates to the analyst. The analyst helps elucidate these for the patient, who refines, corrects, rejects, and adds further thoughts and feelings. During the years that an analysis takes place, the patient wrestles with these insights, going over them again and again with the analyst and experiencing them in daily life, in fantasies, and in dreams. Patient and analyst join in efforts not only to modify crippling life patterns and remove incapacitating symptoms, but also to expand the freedom to work and to love. Eventually the patient’s life—his or her behavior, relationships, sense of self—changes in deep and abiding ways.

For Children and Adolescents


Child and adolescent psychoanalysis, both offshoots of adult psychoanalysis, share with it a common theoretical framework for understanding psychological life, while also using additional techniques and measures to deal with the special capacities and vulnerabilities of children. For instance, the young patient is helped to reveal his or her inner feelings and worries not only through words, but also through drawings and fantasy play. In the treatment of all but late adolescents, parents are usually consulted to round out the picture of the child’s life. The goal of child and adolescent analysis is the removal of symptoms and of the psychological roadblocks that interfere with normal development.

Is it Only Therapy?


Although psychoanalysis began as a tool for ameliorating emotional suffering, it is not only a therapy. It is, in addition, a method for learning about the mind, and also a theory, a way of understanding the processes of normal everyday mental functioning and the stages of normal development from infancy to old age. Furthermore, since psychoanalysis seeks to explain how the human mind works, it contributes insight into whatever the human mind produces. In so doing, it has had a profound influence on many aspects of twentieth-century culture.

As a general theory of individual human behavior and experience, psychoanalytic ideas enrich and are enriched by the study of the biological and social sciences, group behavior, history, philosophy, art, and literature. As a developmental theory, psychoanalysis contributes to child psychology, education, law, and family studies. Through its examination of the complex relationship between body and mind, psychoanalysis also furthers our understanding of the role of emotions in health as well as in medical illness.

In addition, psychoanalytic knowledge is the basis of all other dynamic approaches to therapy. Whatever the modifications, the insights of psychoanalysis form the underpinnings of much of the psychotherapy employed in general psychiatric practice, in child psychiatry, and in most other individual, family, and group therapies.

The Psychoanalytic Tradition


Sigmund Freud was the first psychoanalyst. Many of his insights into the human mind, which seemed so revolutionary at the turn of the century, are now widely accepted by most schools of psychological thought. Although others before and during his time had begun to recognize the role of unconscious mental activity, Freud was the preeminent pioneer in understanding its importance. Through his extensive work with patients and through his theory building, he showed that factors which influence thought and action exist outside of awareness, that unconscious conflict plays a part in determining both normal and abnormal behavior, and that the past shapes the present. Although his ideas met with antagonism and resistance, Freud believed deeply in the value of his discoveries and rarely simplified or exaggerated them for the sake of popular acceptance. He saw that those who sought to change themselves or others must face realistic difficulties. But he also showed that, while the dark and blind forces in human nature sometimes seem overwhelming, psychological understanding, by enlarging the realm of reason and responsibility, can make a substantial difference to troubled individuals and even to civilization as a whole.

Building on such ideas and ideals, psychoanalysis has continued to grow and develop as a general theory of human mental functioning, while always maintaining a profound respect for the uniqueness of each individual life. Ferment, change, and new ideas have enriched the field, and psychoanalytic practice has adapted and expanded. But psychoanalysts today still appreciate the persistent power of the irrational in shaping or limiting human lives, and they therefore remain skeptical of the quick cure, the deceptively easy answer, the trendy or sensationalistic. Like Freud, they believe that psychoanalysis is the strongest and most sophisticated tool for obtaining further knowledge of the mind, and that by using this knowledge for greater selfawareness, patients free themselves from unnecessary suffering, and improve and deepen human relationships.

Who Can Benefit?


Because analysis is a highly individualized treatment, people who wish to know if they would benefit from it should seek consultation with an experienced psychoanalyst. Still, some generalizations can be made, The person best able to undergo psychoanalysis is someone who, no matter how incapacitated at the time, is basically, or potentially, a sturdy individual. This person may have already achieved important satisfactions—with friends, in marriage, in work, or through special interests and hobbies—but is nonetheless significantly impaired by long-standing symptoms: depression or anxiety, sexual incapacities, or physical symptoms without any demonstrable underlying physical cause. One person may be plagued by private rituals or compulsions or repetitive thoughts of which no one else is aware. Another may live a constricted life of isolation and loneliness, incapable of feeling close to anyone. A victim of childhood sexual abuse might suffer from an inability to trust others. Some people come to analysis because of repeated failures in work or in love, brought about not by chance but by selfdestructive patterns of behavior. Others need analysis because the way they are—their character—substantially limits their choices and their pleasures. And still others seek analysis definitively to resolve psychological problems that were only temporarily or partially resolved by other approaches.

Whatever the problem—and each is different—that a person brings to the analyst, it can be properly understood only within the context of that person’s strengths and life situation. Hence, the need for a thorough evaluation to determine who will benefit—and who will not from psychoanalysis.

Who is a Psychoanalyst?


The designation psychoanalyst is not protected by federal or state law: anyone, even an untrained person, may use the title. It is therefore important to know the practitioner’s credentials before beginning treatment.

Graduate psychoanalysts trained under the auspices of the American Psychoanalytic Association have had very rigorous and extensive clinical education. Candidates accepted for training at an accredited psychoanalytic institute must meet high ethical, psychological, and professional standards. These candidates are physicians who have completed a four-year residency program in psychiatry, or psychologists or social workers who have completed a doctoral program in their fields and have had intensive clinical experience. Outstandingly qualified scholar researchers, educators, and selected other professionals may also be approved for psychoanalytic training. All accepted candidates, whatever their background, then begin six to ten years of psychoanalytic training.

This training consists of three parts. Candidates attend classes in psychoanalytic theory and technique. They undergo a personal analysis. And they conduct the psychoanalysis of at least three patients under the close and extended supervision of experienced analysts. Candidates who plan to treat children attend further classes and, with supervision, analyze boys and girls ranging in age from toddlers to late adolescents.

Besides conducting psychoanalysis, most graduate analysts also practice intensive and brief psychotherapy, sometimes prescribing medication. Many treat couples, conduct family or group therapy sessions, and work with the aging.

Because psychoanalysts are provided with the most thorough education available in normal and pathological development, their training enhances the quality of all their therapeutic work. It also informs their community activities as teachers, supervisors, consultants, and researchers, in the many different settings—hospitals, medical schools, colleges, day-care centers—where analysts are found.

How to find a Psychoanalyst


To find a psychoanalyst, you may use the CFPS Faculty Roster section . A number of these analysts are capable of conducting analysis in other languages besides English.

For those who cannot afford private fees, treatment is available through our member institutes at lower cost. Psychoanalysts in training— physicians, psychologists, or social workers who are already experienced therapists—will often adjust their fees to the financial needs of the patient. In addition, because of their commitment to analysis and to community service, many graduate analysts also make an effort to treat patients at reduced rates.

The American Psychoanalytic Association


The
American Psychoanalytic Association was founded in 1911 and currently has a membership of about 3000 analysts. It also includes accredited training institutes and affiliate psychoanalytic societies throughout the United States. Since its inception, it has been a member of the International Psychoanalytical Association, the official accrediting body for worldwide psychoanalysis.

One of the main functions of the American Psychoanalytic Association is scientific. It keeps members informed by providing forums for the exchange of new ideas and discoveries in areas such as practice, theory, and research. It holds two annual national meetings, and publishes the highly respected Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association. Founded in 1953, the Journal is noted for the outstanding quality of its articles on all aspects of psychoanalysis, as well as articles relevant to other areas of mental health and the behavioral sciences, including the application of psychoanalysis to other fields. Through the national organization and its member institutes and societies, the Association engages in a wide variety of educational activities.

A major responsibility of the Association is that of creating and maintaining high professional standards. The process whereby a new training institute may be granted membership in the Association is rigorous. Periodically the entire educational program at each member institute is re-evaluated to assure that these requisite standards are maintained. In addition, the Association evaluates graduates from approved institutes who wish to become certified members.